Welcome to the photo library of common allergenic plants in Sarasota Florida.

This photo safari of the most common plant allergy culprits was mostly set right in Dr. Ly’s backyard and local Twin Lakes Park off of I-75 exit 205 on Clark Rd. We’d like to thank the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Sarasota extension Master Gardeners and horticulturist Erin Alvarez for their expertise and kindness in identifying our local flora. The identification of these plants is purely for scientific curiosity as many pollens can travel hundreds of miles in the wind and cause plant allergies in sensitized people. Luckily, you don’t have to cut down your own oak trees, because the pollen is abundant in our area whether you have the tree on your lot or not.

Plants

Live Oak

Live Oak

One of many species of oak found locally that are responsible for plant allergies. Location- near Twin Lakes Park

Australian Pine

Australian Pine

An invasive tree that is not a true pine tree–responsible for may plant allergies. To me it looks like a feathery pine tree with branches close to the base of the trunk. Location- lining the sidewalk of a condo near Siesta Key Village, however, you can see them all over Lido and Siesta.

Australian Pine Close Up

Australian Pine Close Up

The leaves look like notched or knobby, articulated pine needles.

Red Cedar

Red Cedar

Location- fire station at the corner of Twin Lakes Park.

Bald Cypress

Bald Cypress

Surprisingly, cypress trees don’t need to be in swamps! They are all over Sarasota. They look like feathery Christmas trees with knobby roots poking up from the ground. Location- Corner of Hummingbird and Clark Rd. at Twin Lakes Park.

Bald Cypress Close Up

Bald Cypress Close Up

Bayberry

Bayberry

Also known as wax myrtle. These are really large bushes with many delicate little berries. Location- lining the lakes of Twin Lakes Park.

Bayberry Close Up

Bayberry Close Up

Elm

Elm

Common flowering perennial tree found in the wetlands. Location- sidewalk of the Sarasota IFAS building.

Winged Elm Close Up

Winged Elm Close Up

Mulberry

Mulberry

This Mulberry sapling was recently planted in my front yard. Mulberries have a delightful fruit that is similar to a seedless blackberry.

Sycamore

Sycamore

A beautiful tree with a red peeling papery bark and wide leaves. Location- house near Twin Lakes Park.

Sycamore Close Up

Sycamore Close Up

Grasses

Bahia Grass

Bahia Grass

Tropical to subtropical perennial grass with V shaped flowering branches. Location- My front yard.

Bermuda Grass

Bermuda Grass

A creeping grass with short grey-green blades. The seed heads can be in clusters of two to six. Location- My front yard.

Johnson Grass

Johnson Grass

An invasive grass that is considered more like a weed. Location- Twin Lakes Park.

Timothy Grass

Timothy Grass

An abundant perennial grass with a fuzzy looking flowering head. Location- My front yard.

Weeds

Ragweed

Ragweed

Notoriously allergenic. Up to fifty percent of allergic rhinitis is caused by ragweed sensitivity. Location- Twin Lakes Park.

Dog Fennel

Dog Fennel

Common weed that thrives on roadsides, fence lines, and fields. Location- My back yard.

Lambs Quarter

Lambs Quarter

Perennial or annual flowering plant found almost anywhere in the world. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Nettle

Nettle

Annual or perennial plant with many species having stinging hairs or nettles. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Pigweed

Pigweed

Summer annual weeds. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Dockweed

Dockweed

Common perennial herbs. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Breathing Easier? June Pollen Report.

  According to Accuweather, we should be breathing easier in June. Ragweed, tree pollen and grass pollen are historically low to moderate in the month of June.

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May Pollen Report–Oak, Grasses and Hickory

Expect medium pollen levels for May in Southwest Florida. Less if we get more rain! The key culprits for this time of year are Oak (tapering off), Bermuda Grass and Hickory. From PollenLibrary.com    

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April Plant Pollen Report: Welcome Ragweed!

You probably barely survived the March Live Oak pollen implosion, and hopefully, by now it’s rained taking some of that pollen out of the air. In April, we welcome Ragweed, but not to worry, historically pollen counts for ragweed, grass and trees are on the low side. We recommend closing the windows, staying indoors when…

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What’s responsible for your spring misery? Live Oak.

Live Oak allergy is the most troublesome pollen for spring allergy sufferers. The yellow-green oak pollen coats everything from your car to the sidewalk — and even the grass-heavy pollen can linger in the air for weeks depending on whether or not we receive any rain.   The oak tree pollen we get over those 2…

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February Pollen Report

February’s worst pollen offenders? Bald Cypress and Juniper. Counts are moderate right now. Alas, Jupiter is a common ground cover given it’s extremely resistant to heat and drought. Native to swampy conditions, the bald cypress is another “survivor,” also able to withstand dry, sunny weather and is hardy in USDA climate zones 5 through 10. The…

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